The Thomas Blog

BIM vs CAD What's The Difference
Data Syndication

BIM Vs. CAD Files: What's The Difference?

What's the difference between CAD and BIM? To put it simply, it depends on your project.

BIM Vs. CAD — Which To Use?

CAD is typically used for industrial design of mechanical and electrical assemblies, from airplanes to iPhones. BIM is used exclusively in the design and construction of commercial buildings like airports, office towers or schools.  BIM also includes important characteristics to allow for virtual collision detection and the discovery of construction-related problems prior to breaking ground.

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Data Syndication

Becoming BIM Ready: The Risk Of Doing Nothing

Building Product Manufacturers (BPM) were hit particularly hard during the Great Recession that struck the U.S. economy in 2008. With the economy spiraling downward, commercial building projects were either de-funded or put on indefinite hold. Because of this setback, many BPMs became extremely conservative financially and very insular in their sales & marketing.

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Events

Building Product Manufacturers: Don't Miss The Building Content Summit

The commercial building industry has been undergoing immense change over the past 5-10 years largely driven by the adoption of BIM. 

BCS brings Architects, Engineers and Contractors together with Building Product Manufacturers (BPM’s) and Solution Providers to discuss changes in the way content is developed, distributed, selected and specified within the global BIM workflow. The needs of Design professionals are constantly evolving toward richer, data driven, multi-format product information.

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BIM

CAD vs. BIM Files: 3 Major Differences

For decades, product design engineers have used computer-aided design (CAD) programs — such as Autodesk’s AutoCAD — to design various parts and components. These sophisticated programs are capable of creating extremely detailed 2D and 3D models.

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Data Syndication

3 Reasons ISO Standards Aren't Enough To Get Specified

International standards like ISO, ANSI, NEMA are well-established across businesses in the industrial market.

These standards, developed by technical experts in national and international trade associations, influence market requirements and have become the benchmark for quality among manufacturers.

However, the standards must be broad enough to apply to different businesses and applications, and thus define form, fit and function at only generic levels.

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