Marketing and Sales for Today’s Buyers: Three Tips to Get the Most Out of the Relationship

It’s always been a tough relationship to nail down, but today’s landscape of buyer behavior has thrown yet another money wrench into the workings of your sales and marketing unit.

On the marketing side, the challenge is to address the diverse needs of prospects who get as far as 70% of the way to a purchase before contacting a salesperson.

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Just a few of the difficulties that salespeople now face include less cycle time to build a relationship, more competition, and buyers who are increasingly immune to traditional sales methods.

What’s a manager to do?

Marketing has never been more important  whether you have a dedicated marketing department, or are working to address that need however possible. The traditional sales and marketing core functions haven’t changed  they just need to be leveraged to fit the purchasing experience that buyers now expect. Here are three ways to make sure that you’re in tune with those expectations:

1) Let your teams do what they’re best at: Marketing’s job has never been to close sales, and sales isn’t there to generate leads and build interest. Make sure that your marketing efforts are as efficient and effective as possible  leveraging inbound marketing, communicating in a way that your buyers are receptive to, and being present where your target prospects search. Ensure that salespeople are getting quality leads and have what they need to get to “Yes.”

2) Provide all the tools that salespeople need: There are three key types of marketing material that help on this front:

  • Client-facing content  to generate interest and attract leads.

  • Sales-facing content  to provide additional information and give your sales force ammo to answer any questions prospects might have.

  • Internally-facing content  There’s typically an additional sale that needs to be made, aside from the initial prospect contact: a decision maker “on the inside” who needs to sign off on any new program. Make sure sales can provide materials to help contacts make the final, internal “sell.”

3) Understand what salespeople face: As the front line as well as the linchpin of any deal, salespeople will always have the best knowledge of what prospects are looking for. What questions do they ask? What are their pain points? What’s most important to them? This is invaluable knowledge for all stages of the sales cycle. Regular and open communication and information from sales will ensure that your marketing materials are as effective and up-to-date as possible — making it easier for everyone to create more business.

It’s always been a tough relationship to nail down, but today’s landscape of buyer behavior has thrown yet another money wrench into the workings of your sales and marketing unit. On the marketing side, the challenge is to address the diverse needs of prospects who get as far as 70% of the way to a purchase before contacting a salesperson. Just a few of the difficulties that salespeople now face include less cycle to build a relationship, more competition, and buyers who are increasingly immune to traditional sales methods. What’s a manager to do?

 

Marketing has never been more important – whether you have a dedicated marketing department, or are working to address that need however possible. The traditional sales and marketing core functions haven’t changed – they just need to be leveraged to fit the purchasing experience that buyers now expect. Here are three ways to make sure that you’re in tune with those expectations:

 

1) Let your teams do what they’re best at: Marketing’s job has never been to close sales, and sales isn’t there to generate leads and build interest. Make sure that your marketing efforts are as efficient and effective as possible – leveraging inbound marketing, communicating in a way that your buyers are receptive to, and being present where your target prospects search. Ensure that sales is getting quality leads and has what they need to get to “Yes.”

 

2) Provide all the tools that salespeople need: There are three key types of marketing material that help on this front:

·         Client-facing content – to generate interest and attract leads.

·         Sales-facing content – to provide additional information and help answer any questions prospects might have.

·         Internally-facing content – There’s typically an additional sale that needs to be made, aside from the initial prospect contact: a decision maker “on the inside” who needs to sign off on any new program. Make sure sales can provide materials to help contacts make the final, internal “sale.”

 

3) Understand what salespeople face: As the front line as well as the linchpin of any deal, salespeople will always have the best knowledge of what prospects are looking for. What questions do they ask? What are their pain points? What’s most important to them? This is invaluable knowledge for all stages of the sales cycle. Regular and open communication and information from sales will ensure that your marketing materials are as effective and up-to-date as possible – making it easier for everyone to create more business.

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